Pinktober

2 October 2016

This post initially appeared on DrAttai.com

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM), which means pink is everywhere. Stores start setting out pink merchandise towards the end of September, and the displays often rival Christmas merchandising. How did this happen?

The original pink ribbon was actually peach. A woman by the name of Charlotte Haley made them in her home, and handed them out with cards stating: “The National Cancer Institute annual budget is $1.8 billion, only 5 percent goes for cancer prevention. Help us wake up our legislators and America by wearing this ribbon.” Ms. Haley was then approached by SELF magazine and breast cancer survivor Estee Lauder, who wanted to use the ribbon as part of a breast cancer awareness issue. Ms. Haley turned them down as she didn’t want her efforts to become overly commercialized. As the magazine and Ms. Lauder needed a symbol, the pink ribbon was born. The Susan G. Komen Foundation handed them out at their 1991 race, and in 1992 it officially became the symbol of NBCAM.

Many women who have been treated for breast cancer wear pink to signify their struggles with the disease. Family members and friends often wear pink to show their support of a loved one. For some, wearing pink is an important show of strength and solidarity. However, not everyone feels comfortable with being “branded” in such a way – a patient once asked me “I don’t HAVE to wear pink, do I?” Men with breast cancer have traditionally been left out from such movements, although the pink and blue ribbon now is used for male breast cancer awareness campaigns.

We all want do do something to help end a disease that impacts so many. The NFL goes pink every October, and many organizations host  “save the *** (boobies, tatas, etc)” campaigns, all in the name of breast cancer awareness. Awareness is important – increased awareness is one reason that many women no longer feel embarrassed about going to a physician when they feel a lump in their breast. Not everyone is aware – there are still women and men diagnosed at later stages, especially in minority and underserved populations. But awareness and early detection do not equal cure. Awareness is not enough. Research is needed. Why do some women and men develop breast cancer? Why do some breast cancers spread? Why do some patients respond to treatment and some do not? Why do 40,000 women in the US alone still die due to metastatic breast cancer? We do not have prevention, and we do not have a cure.

10043812_sMoney is needed to fund worthy research projects, initiatives aimed at improving access to care, and support programs. However, pink merchandise is not necessarily the answer – we can’t shop our way out of breast cancer. It is important in October and all year to “think before you pink“. The term “pink washing” has been applied to those organizations who utilize pink for the sole purpose of raising their own brand awareness. A tag noting “in support of breast cancer awareness” sometimes means just that – no dollars donated, just “awareness”. Some of the marketing campaigns even promote products that may be harmful – alcohol, high fat foods, and other substances linked to an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

Directly donating to organizations that perform or fund cancer research is one way to help. Patients with breast cancer also need support services. There are many organizations ranging from large national ones to local community nonprofits that provide a variety of free services such as transportation, counseling, financial aid to cover insurance gaps, and even childcare. Before you donate to a nonprofit organization, first confirm that they are legitimate – Charity Navigator or a similar site can help. In addition, do some basic research – make sure that the organization’s mission is aligned with your preferences. Do you want to help fund education or awareness campaigns, support services, research on metastatic disease, or research on prevention? A quick review of an organization’s mission statement can ensure that you are donating to a cause that you support.

So this fall, think twice about buying those pink breath mints. If you want to make a purchase to honor a loved one, make sure you know whether or not any money will be donated for breast cancer research, education, or support. If you are donating to an organization, make sure that organization is funding programs that you support.

Also realize that you also don’t need to spend a lot of (or any) money to make a difference. Nonprofit organizations and cancer centers are usually happy to have volunteers. If you want to make it more personal, offer to cook meals, do a few loads of laundry or clean the house for someone you know who is being treated for breast cancer. Provide transportation (and company) for appointments. Offer to take someone’s kids for the afternoon so the patient can get some rest. The possibilities are endless.

This October, you can make a difference, and it doesn’t have to involve purchasing a pink kitchen appliance.

Zucchini!

As usual, I over planted. It was so warm in February that I started the zucchini seeds outside mid-month, along with the cucumbers and winter squash. The cucumbers took off, but the zucchini seemed pretty sluggish. So about a month later I planted a few more seeds, and a few more after that. Anyone who has ever grown zucchini knows what happens next…

babyThey are sneaky. One day they’re cute little creatures, still with flower attached, and the next day they’re monsters.grown up zucc

 

 

 

I made plenty of grilled “zucchini steaks”, zucchini noodles, and zucchini salads. I gave a lot away. But after a while, you just can’t eat any more green. So I found some incredible creative recipes. Below are some of my favorites. For all recipes I used lite coconut milk whenever milk of any kind was called for. I use raw walnut oil in place of any other oils. I also usually add more cinnamon and vanilla than the recipe calls for. All of the recipes are gluten free, some are vegan. Some recipes call for lining the pan with parchment paper – I don’t do that (except for the cookies) but I do lightly grease my baking pans with coconut oil. My freezer is full and my tummy is happy.

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Simply Taylor Maple Zucchini Bread
I added 1/2 cup chopped walnuts. Very moist, mild banana bread flavor. Probably good with some chocolate chips. 8×4″ loaf pan and took about 10 minutes longer in my oven.

Chocolate Covered Katie Zucchini Brownies I used twice the amount of melted chocolate she calls for in the frosting and to me it was the perfect amount.

Home to Heather Chocolate Chip Zucchini Cake I’m usually an “everyone in the pool” baker – wets and drys get all jumbled up at once, pulse in nuts and chips at the end. This calls for 3 bowls – one for wets, one for drys, and one for egg whites that need to be whipped and folded into the batter. Way too complicated for me but it called for 1 1/2 cups of shredded zucchini and I had a lot to get rid of. WORTH THE EFFORT!!

Zucchini / Banana Bread with Buckwheat Flour – I made this as a loaf instead of muffins. 9×5″ loaf pan, 350 x 50 minutes. Much denser than the maple zucchini bread but still very good.

Hummusapien Flourless Peanut Butter Zucchini Brownies – I made these with raw cashew butter instead of peanut butter. 9 x 13 baking dish, gobbled up by staff (and me) in about 3 days.

Quinoa Zucchini Breakfast Cookies – Soft oatmeal -type cookies. I added chocolate chips. Because everything is better with chocolate.

Please add links to your favorite zucchini recipes!

Reflections on an Incredible Year

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Passing the gavel to Dr. Sheldon Feldman

On April 15, 2016, I passed the gavel of the American Society of Breast Surgeons (ASBrS) to our new President, Dr. Sheldon Feldman. The weeks leading up to the meeting were filled with anticipation, anxiety, and a few nightmares. I had dreams that I slept through my Presidential Address, and that I forgot to prepare my slides. My nightmares stopped when 2 weeks before the meeting, I had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Chip Cody, my predecessor. He is a breast surgical oncologist at the Memorial Sloan Cancer Center in New York and a very experienced and polished speaker. He let me know that he also had nightmares before his Presidential Address – it wasn’t just me! The meeting itself brought many emotions, including a bit of last minute panic before the big talk, joy, and pride. Those words don’t do the emotions justice.

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2015 – The Garden Review

It was a great year for the garden! I removed what little grass was left, so the growing space expanded. I had a respectable crop of spinach, but a small crop of sugar snap peas, broccoli and blueberries – likely due to the very warm and dry winter. This summer I had my first “real” (more than a handful) crop of raspberries, blackberries and figs, and as usual, the strawberries were delicious.

The tomatoes went crazy – and I still have a few sungold orange cherries (in December!)- they just won’t quit! While the plant has gotten quite spindly, I can’t bear to dig it up since it’s still flowering and fruiting. Time will tell if it will make it through the winter.  One of my most prolific tomato plants came up as a compost volunteer in a relatively shady spot, so I might intentionally plant there next year.

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#ILookLikeASurgeon

Originally posted on DrAttai.com

14 August 2015

It was hard not to get swept up in this one. Anyone who has frequented You Tube knows that certain posts go “viral”. Everyone gets caught up, there is a period of intense conversation and attention, and then it’s gone, replaced by the next trend. While I’ve been amused by some of these “current events”, I’ve never been an active participant. Until now.

A few months ago, This is What We Look Like launched. The purpose:  “Promoting the presence, awareness, and progress of women in traditionally male dominated fields – Filling the web with images of women doing what is usually considered men’s work”. Images of women wearing t-shirts with slogans such as “This is What a [Drummer/CEO/Philosopher/Surgeon] Looks Like” began to fill the internet.

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15 Random Things About Me

I’m not an active blogger  – my last post was over 6 months ago. However, when Jackie Fox tagged me in a tweet on Sunday, I gave in to peer pressure, hunted down my password, and put together a few things you might not know about me.

Here you go – 15 Random Things About Me:

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Spring!

Although the calendar says spring does not arrive for a few weeks, since the clocks have changed and we have had barely a hint of winter (2 nights of “frost” in December and rain last weekend), it’s spring as far as I’m concerned. Oh – and it was 80 degrees yesterday. I’ve previously written about how much I love this time of year – and 2014 is no different. While we don’t have the cold and dark winter that much of the country experiences, there is still something magical about how the garden just comes to life in early March. Everything is lush, green, and growing. It gives me hope and it makes me smile.

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